Apr
21
2009
0

Country Store in Randolph Country

 Asheboro, North Carolina

When Ashley was photographing this unique country store and gas station he thought it had been located here since the 1930’s but actually it was built in 1977 by a man who is a collector and restorer of things past.

All the building materials were either salvaged or collected at auctions from homes or buildings that were either being demolished or restored.  The beams were from an old ammunitions plant in the county.   The siding was retrieved from an older home and the front doors came from a barn.  The flooring, windows and beaded ceiling are from a building that was being demolished.  The columns for the foundation as well as the steps are Mount Airy Granite from an old home in Asheboro.  The counters inside the store were purchased at auction in Seagrove, North Carolina.

When Darrell had collected enough materials he designed and built the store from photographs as well as old stores and gas stations that he visited through the years.

All the gas pumps and signs outside the store as well as the contents inside are all original there are no reproductions.

Inside, the woodstove is a US Army Cannon Heater that was found beside a railroad tract the burns coal or wood.  There are Coco Cola posters from 1947 that were found under a linoleum rug in a home that was being remolded, a kerosene pump circa 1900 from the Brower Pump Company as well as an 1898 patent glass dome for a gas pump.  There are bank ledgers that were purchased at a warehouse sale in Franklinville, NC dating back to 1899 from the Bank of Randolph, the first bank in Randolph County.

This is just a small sample of antiques and memorabilia that line the shelves and counters of this country store.  Here you are taken back in time when enjoying a game of checkers and swapping stories was the way to spend and afternoon-

Kay

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Apr
20
2009
2

Yellowstone National Park

  “Fire Burn and Caldron Bubble”

Yellowstone National Park is home to the world’s largest concentration of thermal features.   In fact, the geyser region of the park occupies the ancient Yellowstone Caldera that last erupted 630,000 years ago.  The floor of the giant crater dropped more than one thousand feet and the entire floor of the Caldera is “alive” as it huffs upward and puffs downward over decades of molten rock, hot water and steam that is moving constantly beneath the Caldera from a few miles to a couple of hundred miles deep.

As Ashley and I were exploring the park, we found the Mud Pots located in the Lower Geyser Basin. Mud Pots are turbulent pools of hot muddy water.  The water becomes acidic which in turn breaks down the rocks and minerals to form mud. As we approached the area there was a smell of “rotten eggs” due to the presence of sulfur in the mud that the Hot Springs do not have.  These areas are
 being closely monitored for information about future volcanic activity because they are close to one of the major vents where lava flowed during the Caldera’s collapse.  Of course this is one bit of information I tried not to think about as we followed the boardwalk trail that guided us in and around the basin!

Surrounded by snow and freezing temperatures, we could feel the heat radiating from the colorful Mud Pots as they bubbled and boiled.  The varying shades of beige, pink and slate are due to the iron oxide in the mud.

Observing this incredible landscape brings to mind the scene from Macbeth where the witches are gathering and chanting - 

                                “Like a hell-broth boil and bubble!”——-
Kay

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Apr
19
2009
0

Art Gallery along the Colorado River

 Petroglyphs Moab Utah

Driving along the south side of the Colorado River outside Moab Utah we found amazing rock art of the Anasazi Indians.  Ancient pueblo dwellers, they inhabited the four corners of the southwest -Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Colorado from approximately 200 to 1300 AD.  They built their dwellings in caves and on ledges of the narrow canyon walls.  It was on these canyon walls that we discovered the compelling and mysterious images of the people the Navajo called “Ancient Strangers”.

Through the years there have been many speculations as to the meaning of the rock art images.
There were many squiggly lines, spirals, animals large and small, Big Horn Sheep, triangular nets and large centipedes.  Also many images of people with shields, spears and objects that appeared to be hanging from their hands –people standing alone, in groups and lines of people connected together—people that were tall, short, round and triangular.  

  In a small area on the wall was a lone hand print—I wanted to “touch” - but the sandstone tends to deteriorate very easily and I did not want to take a chance on damaging this incredible piece of history.

The Anasazi “disappeared” about 700 years ago, leaving all their possessions- the reason for their departure still remains a mystery- but as they speak from the canyon walls the “Ancient Strangers” continue to live on-

Kay

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Apr
18
2009
0

Sunset Beach, North Carolina - Sea Path

 The warm sand squeaks beneath your bare feet as you follow the path through the sea grass over the dunes to the sea-

Ashley and I have walked this path many times in the past forty years and each time Ashley photographs a different area of the path, dunes and marsh in this unique costal area of North Carolina.

Sunset Beach and Bird Island are the Southernmost Islands of North Carolina’s Brunswick Barrier Islands.  Access is by a one lane pontoon bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway.  Sunset Beach has more of a “beachcomber” feeling than the larger beaches on the Grand Strand.  As you walk toward the west end of the beach it joins with Bird Island, a 1,300 acre uninhabited state preserve, that provides important habitat and nesting areas for threatened or endangered birds as well as the Loggerhead Sea Turtle. Along the beach near the dunes you will find a bench and a mailbox—“The Kindred Spirit Mailbox” Here you can sit and read “personal notes” written in journals or on slips of paper or perhaps share your own thoughts with those to come-

 Sunset Beach is undergoing some changes—the sandy path has been replaced by a “boardwalk” and the pontoon bridge is, “as I write,” being replaced by a 65 foot high rise bridge—no more bridge keeper-

Change is inevitable- but along with other “kindred spirits” I hope the
Sea Path will remain-

Kay

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Apr
17
2009
0

Grandview Overlook and Halley’s Comet

 Boone, North Carolina
While living on the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Grandview Overlook was one of our favorite places to visit.  During an early morning run on the parkway, Ashley saw the clouds settling over the valley after a storm, so he ran back home got his camera and returned in the car to photograph the overlook. 

Grandview’s elevation is 3,240 feet and it overlooks the small town of Triplett, North Carolina and the mountains of the Yadkin Valley.  Daniel Boone loved to hunt in this area and Boone’s Branch Camp is located in the valley.

In 1986 about 2 AM we gathered at the overlook with others to view Halley’s Comet.  The last time it appeared was in 1910 and my neighbor had seen it as a boy and now he was going to see it a second time!  No one spoke as we watched the sky with anticipation—then it “just appeared” and we watched as it burned a path across the sky and then it was gone-   Unlike my neighbor, I will not see it a second time when it comes again in early 2066.   

If you should travel on the Blue Ridge Parkway, stop at Milepost 281.0 —

                                  It is a “Grandview”

Kay                       

 

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Apr
16
2009
6

Lumina Pavilion—The Last Days

Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina

 

 

 

 In 1973 Ashley heard the Lumina Pavilion was going to be demolished so we packed the camera and off to Wrightsville Beach we went!

Not only was the Lumina Pavilion and island landmark in Wrightsville Beach, NC for 68 years, it was also a legend among seaside pavilions with its 12,500 square feet of entertainment space.

It was built by the Tidewater Power Company in 1905.  It was given the name Lumina because of the state-of-the art lighting.  It could be seen not only for miles on the island but also by the ships along the North Carolina Coast!

Special trains would bring visitors into Wilmington, NC and they would take the beach trolleys over to Wrightsville Beach to enjoy swimming, outdoor movies, strolling along the beach or many of the grand dances and events that were held in the Lumina’s glory years.  Band leaders such as Glenn Miller, Cab Calloway and Kay Kyser were among the many that played to the packed crowds that came as far away as Atlanta and Washington D.C.

Each year there is a “Lumina Daze” family event held in celebration of Wrightsville Beach and the Lumina.  The 1930’s festivities include big band music, games and movies on the beach.

This image was photographed on the last day before the Lumina was demolished-

No crowds—bands—–or lights—- just 68 years of character standing alone-

Kay

 

 

 

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Apr
15
2009
0

Tree at the Temple of Sinawava

 Zion National Park

Zion National Park in Springdale Utah is the states oldest national park.

Exploring the park we were amazed at the diversity–there were sandstone cliffs, massive canyon walls, slickrock, desert, hanging gardens, waterfalls and many varieties of plants and trees.

As a tree lover, I am always searching for interesting trees for Ashley to photograph.

There is a park shuttle that takes you through Zion Canyon to the trailheads for hiking.  The last stop on the route is The Temple of Sinawava – the name refers to a coyote god of the Paiute Indians (the Paiute lived in the area many years ago.)  It was in this beautiful area of canyon walls and waterfalls that I spotted the tree along the edge of the Virgin River—a feminine form-seated on a rock—legs gracefully curved into the earth—with arms raised in full worship—

When we visited two years later “she” was in the process of deterioration due to lack of sufficient rain fall and snowmelt.  In fact the waterfalls were dry and the Virgin River was running low.

I don’t know how long “she” has been—or how long “she” will remain—But the Temple is slowly losing its last worshiper-

Kay

 

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Apr
14
2009
0

The Fruita Mailbox Tree

 Fruita Utah

In a jumble of slickrocks, cliffs, canyons, domes, arches and deserts lays a “ribbon of green”- the historic district of Fruita.  This is a settlement along the Fremont River that runs through Capitol Reef National Park.  This area in south central Utah is known for its fruit orchards-thus the name Fruita.  It was amazing to see apple, peach, cherry, pear and apricot trees growing in the canyon country of Utah.

The Fremont Indians farmed and hunted this land from AD 700 till AD 1250.  Then in the late 1800’s others began traveling through and finally a small Mormon Settlement was established.

This is where I found “The Mailbox Tree”.  It was an enormous Fremont Cottonwood that had exceeded its life span.  Cottonwoods normally are short lived trees.  It is estimated this tree was planted in 1886.  The community mailboxes were located around the tree so the families came here to pick up their mail.  Some families that lived further down the river had re-used flour sacks that would be left at the tree to collect their mail. The mail carrier had a difficult journey coming through the canyons in his horse drawn wagon therefore he was seldom on time.   The tree provided a nice shady spot to visit with neighbors while waiting on the mail wagon.

Well over a hundred springs have come and gone but “The Mailbox Tree” continues to thrive as the wind carries the white fluffy seeds to take root for new life-

Kay

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Apr
13
2009
1

Shallotte North Carolina

 I have found another tree house!

This one is located just off Highway 17 between Wilmington, North Carolina and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina in the small town of Shallotte.

This community was incorporated in 1899 and was named for the Shallotte River, which was named for the onion-like plants growing along the banks. (I thought that was interesting!)

Driving out to Shallotte Point, the Live Oak stands in the middle of a white picket fence on the side of the road-in fact some of the limbs reach all the way across the road to the other side!  There are no signs directing you or any historical markers to give you any information about this beautiful oak.  But there is a sign on the tree itself that reads, “The experts say this tree could be over 2,000 years old.  If so, it was living when Christ walked the earth.  Let’s take care of it and maybe it will be living when HE returns.”

You can see where large limbs have been lost or damaged due to storms, humans or just aging-but it has not affected the natural beauty and grace of this wonderful tree.

I wish I knew the “Story” of this tree so I could share it with you but does that really matter-didn’t someone say, “a picture is worth a thousands words”…

Kay

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Apr
12
2009
1

The Angel Oak

Charleston, South Carolina

 

Just outside of Charleston, South Carolina, on Johns Island, we found one of the oldest trees east of the Mississippi River- The Angel Oak- it is thought to be more than 1400 years old. (Think about it!)

 

A Live Oak native to the South Carolina Low Country and Sea Islands, it is 65 feet tall, the circumference is 25.5 feet and it covers 17,000 square feet of shade-truly awesome! You really can’t appreciate the size until you see it “in person.”

 

Earliest ownership has been traced to a family in a land grant in1717.  Later it was handed down to the Angel family in a marriage settlement-thus the name –Angel Oak.

 

This oak has survived many hurricanes, floods, earthquakes and the biggest threat of all-humans.  In 1989 it was severely damaged as Hugo came through but has recovered and continues to grow.

 

The limbs are the size of tree trunks: they flow across the ground, under the ground and back up to the top.  This is only seen in the oldest of oak trees.  You could walk right up the limbs into the tree-what a great tree house this would be!

 

This wonderful gift of nature can teach us much about tenacity, beauty and survival–I hope it will continue to thrive for generations to come-

 

Kay

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |

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