Sep
06
2013
0

Home of the Spirits—Antelope Canyon Arizona

 Ashley and I recently visited Lower Antelope Canyon on the Navajo reservation in Page Arizona.  In both the upper and lower canyons there are hidden “slots” that are carved into the Navajo sandstone.  Sam, our native guide told us that as a child he and the other children wanted to play in the “slot” canyons but they were not allowed.  The Elders believed these to be the “Home of the Spirits”-a spiritual and sacred place –only to be entered in a state of quiet and reverence.  Even today the Navajo ask that as you enter you do so in a respectful manner.

Descending into the canyon I had a sense of another time and a “presence” that was not my own.  Light and rock worked together as the changing patterns, shapes and colors swirled and curved all around me-truly a magical and beautiful place!  There were rocks like giant waves and I found myself “listening” for that roaring sound they make when they hit the beach!

I am not fond of “tight” spaces and there were times when we had to turn our bodies sideways and “wiggle” through the rocks (with camera equipment & backpack!) to continue on in the canyon.  When taking camera equipment in you have to be careful of winds gusts up top.  They will cause fine sand to sprinkle down that will damage your camera lens if they are not covered.  We had a couple of gusts just before we climbed out but we had covers!

Ashley captures some wonderful images and I definitely agree with the Elders…the Spirits must reside here-

Kay

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Jun
13
2012
0

Mayo River State Park

 

Amazing three trees in one!

Kay

 

 

 

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Jun
11
2012
0

Mayo River State Park

 

 

 

Sights along the 1.8 mile trail in the Mayo River State Park—

Great hike!

Kay

 

 

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Jun
09
2012
0

Mayo River State Park

Mayo River State Park   is a new park opened in April of 2010 along the Mayo River near Mayodan, N.C. The Mayo River is a tributary of the Dan River that flows though North Carolina and Virginia. It was formally Mayo Park owned by a private corporation and designed by the renowned architect, Antonin Raymond, who worked for Frank Lloyd Wright. The state purchased the park and has made renovations to the buildings on site. The park is one thousand nine hundred and sixty seven acres and has a .5 mile and a 1.8 mile loop hiking trail.   There are also picnic tables, grills, a large picnic shelter, bathroom facilities and two fishing ponds.   Other areas of the park along the river have not been opened to the public at this time as work continues on trails and facilities.  Entrance to the park is near Mayodan at the Mayo Mountain Access. If you are “in the neighborhood” it is a great place for a family gathering!

Kay

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
Jun
07
2012
0

Lovers Leap

While traveling on Highway 58 West, also known as the Jeb Stewart Highway, we found Lovers Leap Overlook near the Meadows of Dan in Patrick County Virginia.  As with many “lovers’ leaps” across the country, this one also has a legend attached involving “star-crossed lovers”.  As I researched I found several different versions of the story and I will share the one I liked the best.  Morning Flower was said to be the daughter of an Indian Chief that became involved with a settler’s son.   They kept their relationship a secret as long as they could but when their families found out; neither the settlers nor the Indians were in favor of their marriage.  They were shunned and threatened by both sides so it is said they jumped together off this high ledge so they would be together forever……sounds a little like Romeo & Juliet —

Kay

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
May
25
2012
0

Waterwheel

Waterwheel, grist mill or corn mill refers to any mill that grinds grain and in the past most small towns and villages had their own. These communities were dependent on local farmers who brought their grain to the local grist mill to have it ground into flour. There are grist mills who continue to grind grain into flour and corn meal.  At Milepost 176, on the Blue Ridge Parkway you can find Mabry Mill, one of the most photographed sites on the parkway, as well as one of the most photographed places in the United States. In fact, it is so famous other states have claimed the mill and put the image on their states postcards! Ed Mabry began construction on the water-powered grist mill in 1903 and by 1910, not only was the grist mill complete but he incorporated a blacksmith and wheelwright shop as well as a sawmill. Ed was one of the fifth generations of Mabry’s to live in this area of Floyd County Virginia. He and his wife operated the mill till 1935. Mabry Mill was remolded by the National Park Service and now serves as a living history center with exhibits depicting life in the rural Appalachians. There are demonstrations of basket weaving, seat caning, spinning, weaving, blacksmithing, as well as a working miller to demonstrate the milling process. Not only can you enjoy ole time bluegrass music every Sunday but on Sundays in October you can observe apple butter making and you can always purchase a bag of fresh ground cornmeal!

Kay

 

 

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
May
24
2012
0

Winter Sky

 

 

 

Viewing the changing sky of a winter sunset from the top of my driveway is one of my many pleasures~

        Kay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
May
23
2012
0

Moon & Stars

 

 

When I heard the learn’d astronomer,
When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me,
When I was shown the charts and diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them,
When I sitting heard the astronomer where he lectured with much
applause in the lecture-room,
How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick,
Till rising and gliding out I wander’d off by myself,
In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time,
Look’d up in perfect silence at the stars.

                                      ~Walt Whitman

 

 
Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
May
22
2012
2

Carolina Anole Lizard

The Carolina Anole Lizard is the common garden lizard that is found throughout the southeastern United States and the Caribbean.  However these lizards do not always remain green.   Their color can change from brown to grey to green depending on the background and other factors.  They can be found on tree trunks, fence post, board walks or any vertical surface. I spotted this one on my porch railing.  He is in the process of extending his colorful dewlap.  Many of you, like me, may be asking what a dewlap is. Researching, I found this is a large flap of skin that hangs beneath the lower jaw or neck of many animals.  Our lizard can retract or extend this flap at anytime to ward off predators and in the male species it is used to attract females in the mating season.   My favorite characteristic of my lizard friend is his ability for pest control, as he loves to eat insects, spiders and all those “buggy critters” that annoy us!

Kay

 

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |
May
18
2012
0

Resting Place

                                                                

 

                                                         

              I found this bench along the shore of Deep River in Franklinville, North Carolina.

              Kay

Written by admin in: Fine Art Photography |

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